5 posts from February 2015

College enrollments falling in Ninth District, nationwide

Something is happening on college campuses across the country—or rather, not happening.

Despite all the messages encouraging college attendance—not to mention job and other data that demonstrate its utility—higher education enrollments have been dropping steadily in recent years, according to data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

Every state in the Ninth District has witnessed an enrollment drop at degree-granting higher education institutions for at least two consecutive years. The drop from fall 2012 to fall 2014 was highest in Montana, at almost 6 percent, while North Dakota and Minnesota were also above the national average (see chart). In fact, save for South Dakota, enrollments have declined in every other district state for at least three years running.

Some of the reason behind the drop is a cyclical economy. Joblessness, for example, tends to push people into school to obtain better skills for the job market, and enrollments swelled during the Great Recession. A stronger job market is likely pulling many students away from their books.

Demographics are also playing a key role. When national higher education enrollment peaked in 2011, people in their so-called prime college years (18 to 21 years old) were also at their peak and have since declined, leading to lower enrollments.

College enrollments -- 2-26-15

Minnesota consumers benefiting from a drop in gasoline prices

 As oil prices have plummeted, so have gasoline prices, since the price of crude oil represents more than half the cost of a gallon of gasoline (see Chart 1).

In Janaury, the price for regular Minnesota gasoline dropped below $2 per gallon, more than $1 per gallon lower than a year earlier. Through the first week of February, Minnesota gasoline prices have picked up by about 20 cents per gallon, but are still about $1 per gallon lower than last year. Gas prices haven’t been consistently below $2 per gallon (other than a six-month period during the Great Recession) since 2004 and earlier.

MN gas prices CH1

As gasoline prices drop, consumers have more disposable income to spend on goods and services other than gas. According the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey data, a $1 per gallon decrease in gasoline prices over a year’s time could provide consumers with an additional $400 to $1,200, depending on how much they typically spend on gasoline (see Chart 2). Consumers with lower income tend to spend less on gasoline than those with higher income.

As a share of total expenditure, consumers in the highest income quintile spend a smaller share on gasoline and motor oil than those in lower quintiles (see Chart 3).

Retail sales data are not yet showing an impact from low gasoline prices. According to U.S. retail sales data, while gasoline prices and sales at gasoline stations dropped notably in December and January, there were only mild increases in U.S. retail sales after removing sales at auto dealers and gasoline stations. Consumers could be spending their extra disposable income on items not recorded in retail sales figures, such as utility, cable or medical bills, or putting it into savings.

MN gas prices CH2-3

Ad hoc survey: Ninth District businesses plan to ramp up hiring, increase starting pay

The Ninth District economy is in growth mode and employment is expected to increase, based on a recent poll of 140 business contacts from around the district (see methodology below).

Businesses are expecting to expand, with 46 percent of respondents planning to increase employment at their firms and 58 percent of these firms citing anticipated high sales growth as the most important factor behind increased employment. Only 3 percent plan to decrease employment. In the same survey a year ago, 41 percent planned to increase employment and 9 percent planned to cut jobs (see chart).

Other important factors cited for new hiring were overworked staff, the need for additional skills and improved financial condition of firms. The vast majority of respondents plan to use current employee referrals, word of mouth and advertising to get new employees. Forty-eight percent plan to use a recruiting firm, which is up from 22 percent of respondents in last year’s poll. Twenty-seven percent of respondents also plan to raise starting pay compared with only 8 percent last year.

Feb ad hoc survey Ch1+meth -- 2-13-15

Methodology: On Dec. 1, 2014, the Minneapolis Fed emailed a web-based survey to about 600 Beige Book contacts from around the Ninth District. By Feb. 12, 140 contacts had filled out the survey. The respondents come from a variety of industries (see table).

The aches and pains of working-age disability

Since the 1980s, working-age disability has been rising, and particularly over the past decade. Many disorders can qualify a person for one of two major federal disability programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

However, recipients are increasingly qualifying for these programs because of either mental disorders or conditions related to the musculoskeletal system or connective tissues, which covers a variety of muscle, back and joint disorders like arthritis, back pain, tendonitis and herniated discs.

In Ninth District states, the most common disability diagnosis (at 42 percent) for SSDI recipients is a mental disorder, such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or bipolar disorder (see Chart 1). While recipient growth in this category exceeded 50 percent from 2003 to 2013, it has leveled off in recent years.

The fastest growing diagnosis involves conditions related to the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue. This category covered about one in four SSDI recipients in 2013; total recipients have doubled over the past decade. Growth in these two major diagnosis categories has also been faster in the Ninth District than in the nation over the past decade (see Chart 2).

For much more on disability trends in the Ninth District, see the January cover of the fedgazette.

Dulguun Batbold, research analyst, contributed data to this article.

Disability diagnosis CH1-2 -- 2-10-15


A look at rising veteran disability

The incidence of working-age, civilian disability, as measured by enrollments in the largest federal disability programs, has been rising for the better part of three decades (see discussion in the January fedgazette). But one other federal disability program has been witnessing even faster growth of late: veteran disability.

Veterans’ disability compensation, as it’s called, is paid to veterans who incur a disability during active military service or are diagnosed with a post-service disability that is presumed to be related to military service. After seeing little growth in the 1990s, the number of veterans qualifying for disability compensation rose by 62 percent from 2000 to 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (see Chart 1). During this time, the population of eligible veterans also shrank by 17 percent, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Though historical data on veteran disability by state are not publicly available, recent data suggest that the same growth trend is occurring in Ninth District states. From 2011 to 2013, every district state saw growth of at least 7 percent in veteran disability; Minnesota’s 12 percent growth topped the national average (see Chart 2).

Veterans disability Ch1-2

Across district states, 187,000 veterans received disability benefits in 2013. That translates to a small but notable portion of the district labor force—ranging from about 2 percent (Wisconsin) to almost 4 percent (Montana), with most district states above the national average (see Chart 3).

Veterans disability Ch3

While veterans receiving disability compensation are spread throughout a given state, they tend to be more concentrated around military bases, such as Camp Ripley in central Minnesota, Ellsworth Air Force Base in Rapid City, S.D., and Malmstrom Air Force Base near Great Falls, Mont. (see map).

Dulguun Batbold, research analyst, contributed data to this article.

Veterans disability -- Map 2-4-15