A look at rising veteran disability

The incidence of working-age, civilian disability, as measured by enrollments in the largest federal disability programs, has been rising for the better part of three decades (see discussion in the January fedgazette). But one other federal disability program has been witnessing even faster growth of late: veteran disability.

Veterans’ disability compensation, as it’s called, is paid to veterans who incur a disability during active military service or are diagnosed with a post-service disability that is presumed to be related to military service. After seeing little growth in the 1990s, the number of veterans qualifying for disability compensation rose by 62 percent from 2000 to 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (see Chart 1). During this time, the population of eligible veterans also shrank by 17 percent, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Though historical data on veteran disability by state are not publicly available, recent data suggest that the same growth trend is occurring in Ninth District states. From 2011 to 2013, every district state saw growth of at least 7 percent in veteran disability; Minnesota’s 12 percent growth topped the national average (see Chart 2).

Veterans disability Ch1-2

Across district states, 187,000 veterans received disability benefits in 2013. That translates to a small but notable portion of the district labor force—ranging from about 2 percent (Wisconsin) to almost 4 percent (Montana), with most district states above the national average (see Chart 3).

Veterans disability Ch3

While veterans receiving disability compensation are spread throughout a given state, they tend to be more concentrated around military bases, such as Camp Ripley in central Minnesota, Ellsworth Air Force Base in Rapid City, S.D., and Malmstrom Air Force Base near Great Falls, Mont. (see map).

Dulguun Batbold, research analyst, contributed data to this article.

Veterans disability -- Map 2-4-15

 

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A look at rising veteran disability

Posted by Ron Wirtz on 02/06/2015

The incidence of working-age, civilian disability, as measured by enrollments in the largest federal disability programs, has been rising for the better part of three decades (see discussion in the January fedgazette). But one other federal disability program has been witnessing even faster growth of late: veteran disability.

Veterans’ disability compensation, as it’s called, is paid to veterans who incur a disability during active military service or are diagnosed with a post-service disability that is presumed to be related to military service. After seeing little growth in the 1990s, the number of veterans qualifying for disability compensation rose by 62 percent from 2000 to 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (see Chart 1). During this time, the population of eligible veterans also shrank by 17 percent, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Though historical data on veteran disability by state are not publicly available, recent data suggest that the same growth trend is occurring in Ninth District states. From 2011 to 2013, every district state saw growth of at least 7 percent in veteran disability; Minnesota’s 12 percent growth topped the national average (see Chart 2).

Veterans disability Ch1-2

Across district states, 187,000 veterans received disability benefits in 2013. That translates to a small but notable portion of the district labor force—ranging from about 2 percent (Wisconsin) to almost 4 percent (Montana), with most district states above the national average (see Chart 3).

Veterans disability Ch3

While veterans receiving disability compensation are spread throughout a given state, they tend to be more concentrated around military bases, such as Camp Ripley in central Minnesota, Ellsworth Air Force Base in Rapid City, S.D., and Malmstrom Air Force Base near Great Falls, Mont. (see map).

Dulguun Batbold, research analyst, contributed data to this article.

Veterans disability -- Map 2-4-15

 

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